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Colorado Vital Records

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The following is for informational purposes only

What are Colorado Vital Records?

Vital records in Colorado are the official records of vital statistics - all births, deaths, adoptions, marriages, and divorces - in the State of Colorado. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, (CDPHE), vital records office, maintains all Colorado vital records. By state law, vital records in Colorado are not public records and may only be released to eligible persons.

 

How Can I Get a Copy of a Birth Certificate in Colorado?

Colorado birth records

Only the following persons, under the circumstances listed below, may obtain a copy of a Colorado birth certificate upon submittal of a birth certificate application and a copy of valid identification:

  • The registrant.
  • A current spouse of the registrant, with a copy of their marriage license, joint income tax returns, insurance policies, or affidavit of common-law marriage.
  • An ex-spouse with proof of direct and tangible interest, such as an insurance policy, or letter from the Social Security Administration.
  • A parent listed on the birth certificate.
  • A step-parent, with a copy of the marriage certificate to a parent listed on the birth certificate.
  • A legal guardian with an original certified court order proving custody.
  • Grandparents and great grandparents, with a birth certificate or death certificate proving the relationship.
  • Siblings and half-siblings, with a birth or death certificate proving at least one same parent.
  • Children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren, with a copy of a birth or death certificate proving the relationship.
  • The legal representative of the registrant, with proof of relationship with the registrant.
  • An attorney-in-fact/agent holding a power of attorney, with a notarized copy of a durable power of attorney.
  • Consulate offices, with proof of appropriate credentials.
  • Adoption agencies, with certified court orders proving custody, or special power of attorney document signed by the mother and father (if the father is listed on the birth certificate).
  • Genealogists, with a notarized signed release from an immediate family member and proof of that family member's relationship to the registrant.
  • In-laws, aunts, uncles, nephews, nieces, and cousins are only eligible for birth records of a deceased relative that are over 50 years old and must present a copy of the registrant's death certificate as well as proof establishing the relationship.
  • Governmental agencies, such as Human Services and the Social Security Administration, with credentials showing the person is associated with that governmental agency.
 

How Can I Get a Copy of a Death Certificate in Colorado?

Colorado death records

Only the following people, under the circumstances listed below, can obtain a Colorado death record upon submittal of a death certificate application:

  • The current spouse, who must be listed on the death certificate.
  • An ex-spouse, who must present proof of direct and tangible interest, such as a Social Security record, or an insurance policy.
  • A parent who must be listed on the death certificate.
  • A step-parent, with a marriage certificate proving the relationship to a parent that is listed on the death certificate.
  • A sibling or half-sibling, with a birth or death certificate showing at least one same parent.
  • Children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren, with a birth certificate(s) and/or death certificate(s) showing their relationship.
  • Step-children with a birth certificate proving the relationship and the biological parent must be listed on the death certificate as the spouse.
  • A legal representative, with proof of client relationship, as well as proof of the client's relationship to the registrant.
  • A person holding a Power of Attorney document, who must present a notarized Durable Power of Attorney that has been signed by the person they are representing.
  • An opposing counsel, however, the certificate will be mailed to court with a motion to seal it as a "confidential record".
  • An agent of a consulate office, with credentials verifying their connection to the Consulate.
  • Genealogists, with a notarized release from an immediate family member as well as proof of the family member's relationship. The certificate will be marked "For Genealogical Use Only".
  • In-laws, aunts, uncles, nephews, nieces, and cousins, may obtain a copy of a death certificate that is more than 25 years old, with proof of the relationship to the decedent. To obtain a copy of a death certificate that is less than 25 years old, these persons would need to present proof of direct and tangible interest, such as an insurance policy or a Last Will and Testament.
  • Insurance companies, employers, probate researchers, and creditors may be able to obtain a copy upon proof of direct and tangible interest.
  • An anatomical board may obtain a copy only if they are listed on the death certificate.
  • A beneficiary, with proof of direct and tangible interest, such as a letter on insurance company or pension plan letterhead that clearly states the applicant is a beneficiary or is eligible to file a claim.
  • A hospital, nursing home, hospice, or physician, upon proof of a patient relationship to the decedent.
  • A funeral director, if listed on the death certificate.
  • A coroner with proof of credentials.
  • An informant, only if listed on the death certificate.
  • Governmental agencies, such as the Social Security Administration or Human Services.
 

How Can I Get a Copy of a Marriage Certificate or Divorce Certificate in Colorado?

Colorado marriage records

Only the following people, under the following circumstances, may obtain a copy of a Colorado marriage certificate, Colorado certificate of civil union, or a Colorado divorce record:

  • The bride or groom listed on the verification.
  • A parent of the bride or groom, if they are listed on the marriage certificate.
  • A stepparent with a marriage record proving the relationship to a parent listed on the marriage certificate.
  • A grandparent or great grandparent, with a birth certificate proving the relationship.
  • Siblings and half-siblings with a birth certificate showing at least one same parent.
  • Children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren with a birth certificate(s) showing the relationship.
  • Step-children, with a marriage certificate and birth certificate proving the relationship.
  • A legal representative, with proof of the client relationship as well as proof of the client's relationship to the registrant.
  • A person holding a power of attorney document, who must present a notarized Durable Power of Attorney document signed by the principal.
  • A consulate office agent with credentials proving their connection to the consulate.
  • Genealogists may obtain a copy with a notarized signed release from an immediate family member as well as proof of that family member's relationship. The copy will be marked "For Genealogical Use Only".
  • In-laws, aunts, uncles, nephews, nieces, and cousins may only obtain a copy if the certificate is more than 75 years old.
  • Probate researchers, creditors, employers, and insurance companies may obtain a copy only upon proof of direct and tangible interest.
  • Governmental agencies such as the Social Security Administration or Office of Human Services may obtain a copy with proof of credentials.

To obtain a certified copy of a Colorado vital record, you should contact the Colorado Department of Health & Environment (CDPHE) vital records division. The agency provides the following services to obtain a copy of a birth, death, marriage, or divorce record:

  • Walk-in – for walk-in service, you may visit the main campus from 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except for state holidays, at:

CDPHE
Vital Records Section
4300 Cherry Creek Drive South
Denver, CO 80246

You may also find other county offices of vital records locations near you that provide walk-in service, as well as at the local county clerk's office.

  • Telephone orders – for telephone orders you should call (866) 300-8540.
  • Online orders – online orders are available through two services: Vital Chek, and Go Certificates.

For walk-in and telephone orders, the Office of Vital Records charges $20 for the first copy of a certificate and $13 for each additional copy ordered at the same time. These fees may be paid by cash (walk-in service only), check, money orders, credit and debit cards (Visa, Mastercard, American Express, and Discover). For telephone orders, there is an additional fee for credit/debit card convenience of $10.

If the certificate is mailed to you via regular mail, there is no additional mailing charge, however, for FedEx or UPS delivery, there will be a $20 mailing fee. For Federal Express delivery, you may pay the additional $20 fee by check, money order, or cashier's check only. For UPS delivery, you may pay the $20 fee via credit cards only, including, Visa, Mastercard, American Express, and Discover.

You must present the proper identification, such as a valid driver's license with your request.

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