Search New Hampshire Public Driving Records

Start your FREE Scan

New Hampshire Public Driving Records

The New Hampshire Department of Safety, Division of Motor Vehicles (New Hampshire DMV) is the government agency responsible for driving history record reports. They issue them to individuals, companies, and other entities in need of the information. However, anyone requesting records must comply with all Driver Privacy Protection Act (DPPA) laws.

The Department of Motor Vehicles has a downloadable form on its website that requestors can use to get copies of driving records. They allow people to drop them off using their Dropbox Services or mail them in. When requesting records for someone other than themselves, users must include a Records Release Form with additional information along with their payment. Companies requesting records also must fill out and include a Certificate of Authority and Release of Motor Vehicle Records form.

Motor vehicle records include personal information such as the driver's name, address, date of birth, driver's license number, hair, eye color, weight, height, and other medical details. The records will also include license status, revocations, suspensions, citations, traffic violations, criminal offenses like DUIs, and accidents.

How to Request a State Driving History Report

The State of NH, Department of Motor Vehicles, offers driving record history reports through the mail and through their dropbox system. The requestor must first download the records release form and fill it out. They have detailed instructions on how to fill out the form depending on who is requesting the records. The user can then drop it off with payment at a dropbox location, DMV office, or mail it in to:

NH Dept. of Safety
DMV - FR Records
23 Hazen Drive, Concord NH 03305

The same form used for driving records can also be used to get a copy of the registration, title search, accident reports, and other types of documents.

NH Motor Vehicle Records Cost

The state offers three different types of reports, and all three cost $15 each, regardless of whether or not the requestor needs a certified copy.

Driving Laws in the State

New Hampshire does not issue learning permits to New Hampshire drivers. However, anyone 15 &1/2 can start learning to drive as long as they have proof of age in the vehicle and drive supervised with an adult at least 25 years old. They cannot learn to drive on a commercial vehicle, though.

The driver must complete and pass a driver education class before applying for their driver's license at age 16. Anyone under 18 must have parental or guardian consent, and they must pass a written and driving exam before receiving their license.

Some other common NH driving laws consists of:

  • Rearview mirrors are required and cannot be broken, cracked, or obstructed
  • All vehicles must have a working defroster to clear an iced windshield
  • Working windshield wipers are required and must be in good condition
  • A license plate on the front and rear of the vehicle is required
  • Every vehicle must have a working muffler system that does not leak or have holes, and it cannot be too loud
  • The speedometer must be operational
  • All children younger than 18 must wear a seat belt
  • All children who are under 6 and less than 55 inches tall must be in a child safety seat
  • When approaching an intersection, drivers must yield the right of way to any vehicle or pedestrian already in the intersection
  • Pedestrians in intersections and crosswalks always have the right of way
  • Drivers must always yield the right of way to vehicles that are a part of a funeral procession
  • Drivers must yield right of way any time; not doing so could cause an accident
  • All vehicles must be inspected after registration each year. Renewals occur in the birth month of the vehicle's owner
  • Drivers are permitted to turn right on red unless there are signs prohibiting it
  • Drivers must use turn signals 100 feet prior to turning on roadways and 500 feet when turning on a highway
  • During school hours (45 minutes before the school opens and 45 minutes after it closes), the speed limit decreases by 10 mph
  • It is illegal to drive too slowly as it impedes other traffic. On the highway, the minimum speed is 45 (in regular weather conditions)
  • Drivers must tap their breaks a couple of times before slowing or stopping to alert cars behind them that they are stopping

The state does use a demerit points system to keep track of serious offenses. If the driver earns too many in a short amount of time, they may lose their driver's license according to the schedule below:

Drivers Under the Age of 18 are Subject to these Suspensions:

  • 6 Points in one calendar year = up to 3 months suspension
  • 12 Points in two calendar years = up to 6 months suspension
  • 18 Points in three calendar years = up to a 1-year suspension

Drivers Under the Age of 21 are Subject to these Suspensions:

  • 9 Points in one calendar year = up to 3 months suspension
  • 15 Points in two calendar years = up to 6 months suspension
  • 21 Points in three calendar years = up to a 1-year suspension

Drivers 21 Years of Age or Older are Subject to these Suspensions:

  • 12 Points in one calendar year = up to 3 months suspension
  • 18 Points in two calendar years = up to 6 months suspension
  • 24 Points in three calendar years = up to a 1-year suspension

Different Types of Driving Reports in the State

The state of New Hampshire offers three types of driving history reports. They are an Insurance Driver Record Report, Certified Driver Record Report, and a Non-Certified Driver Record Report. All records contain the following:

  • Name
  • Date of Birth
  • Address - that shown reflects the most current address appearing on the files of the DMV
  • New Hampshire identification number
  • DMV file number
  • Suspension/Revocation status of the license/operating privilege
  • Insurance filing/SR-22 requirement - required or not
  • Completion date of Safe Driver Course - appears only if completion certificate is provided to DMV
  • Completion date of Driver Attitude Program - appears only if completion certificate is provided to DMV
  • Name(s) the individual is also known as (AKA) and/or was formerly known as (FKA)

The DMV does not release social security numbers.

Insurance Driver Record Report

According to the DMV, "This report has only violations and accidents. The report covers five (5) years on court convictions and three (3) years on crash involvement." This option may be used by insurance companies when they decide to insure motorists or set insurance rates.

Certified Driver Record Report

According to the DMV, "This report has detailed information regarding past history including present and/or past suspensions/revocations, restorations, convictions, and crash involvement. The printed report is stamped with a raised seal and stamped with the Director's signature and the phrase "Certified - True & Correct." The report covers seven (7) years for court convictions, ten (10) years for DWI convictions, and five (5) years on crash involvement. Note: The retention periods are increased for Commercial Drivers."

Non-Certified Driver Record Report

According to the DMV, "This report has detailed information regarding past history including present and/or past suspensions/revocations, restorations, convictions, and crash involvement. The report covers seven (7) years for court convictions, ten (10) years for DWI convictions, and five (5) years on crash involvement. Note: The retention periods are increased for Commercial Drivers."

Criminal Driving Offenses

Criminal driving offenses in NH are serious and may result in hefty fines, jail time, a suspended license, and even court-ordered programs like drug/alcohol rehab or community service. Some other examples of criminal driving offenses in the state are:

  • Reckless driving is a serious offense that carries a mandatory 60 days in jail and a $500 fine plus 6 demerit points
  • DUI/DWI/OUI
  • Vehicular manslaughter
  • Leaving the scene of an accident
  • Disobeying an officer
  • Driving without a license or one that is revoked or suspended
  • Failure to stop at a railroad crossing - misdemeanor
  • Speeding 21+ mph over the speed limit - $496 fine
  • Open container in the car - $186 fine
  • Driving without license plates - $186 fine
  • Passing a school bus - $620 fine

Civil Driving Offenses

Civil driving offenses are far less serious but still carry weight. They may result in fines and points on the driver's license. Some examples of civil driving offense are:

  • Parking in a no-park zone
  • Driving over a firehose without consent - $62 fine
  • Driving on a sidewalk - $62 fine
  • Failure to honor the right of way - $124 fine
  • Tailgating - $124 fine
  • Disobeying flashing signals - $62 fine
  • Not stopping at a red light or stop sign
  • Not yielding
  • Illegal modifications to the vehicle

State Department of Motor Vehicles Driving Records Statistics

The state prioritizes safe roadways and highways and has created a plan to improve safety based on the statistics below:

  • 39,172 people injured
  • The total number of people injured in traffic crashes in New Hampshire from 2010 through 2014 equates to an alarming average of 7,834 people per year
  • 2,745 people seriously injured
  • Serious injuries* changes lives—and oftentimes shorten them. There are unimaginable emotional costs and huge financial implications to the injured, their families, and their communities
  • 556 Lives Lost. Gone Forever
  • Who were these people? What might they have contributed to our lives, to our state, and to our country?

"New Hampshire's goal is to reduce the number of roadway deaths by 50 percent by 2030 (from a baseline year of 2010), and to continue this program until there are ZERO roadway deaths."

The most common reasons for accidents in the state are:

  • Impaired Driving
  • Distracted Driving
  • Speeding

Driver License Record Search Frequently Asked Questions

Below are some frequently asked questions about state driving records.

Who Can Get a Copy of Your Driving Record?

You can easily get a copy of your own record. Someone else can get a copy if you provide permission. Some examples might be financial institutions, insurance companies, government agencies, employers, and other authorized agents.

Can I Use the Online Systems to Make a Driver History Request?

No. The state does not have an online portal where you or anyone else can get a copy of a driver report.

What Information Do I Need to Get a Motor Vehicle Report (MVR)?

When requesting records, you will need to provide your information (name, address, phone) and the driver's full name, date of birth, last known address, driver's license number, license plate, or vehicle ID number.

Does the State Use a Points System?

Yes. The state uses a strict demerit points system, and too many earned in a short amount of time will result in a license suspension.

Helpful State Driving Record Links

Below are some helpful state driving record links.

Disclaimer: The materials presented here are for informational purposes only. The information is taken from state and local resources, and is current as of the most recent site update. Changes made by state and local departments and agencies after our latest update may render some information and fees outdated, and may cause links to break and forms to be unavailable. Infotracer strongly encourages you to visit the relevant state and local resources to ensure you have the most recent information.