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Minnesota Public Driving Records

The Minnesota Driver and Vehicle Services (DVS office) is a Division of the Minnesota Department of Public Safety and the government agency in charge of driving records for individuals, companies, and law enforcement. They provide copies upon request to qualified individuals. In most states this is done by the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV).

The state takes federal and state Driver Privacy Protection Act laws very seriously. They cite punishment according to United States Code, title 18 (USC, title 18) if anyone obtains driver records unlawfully. The state provides a few different options for getting records, and all of them begin with downloading the proper form (PS2502). If someone other than the individual listed in the report requests one, they must also fill out a PS2506 which is an authorization form from the subject.

Driver records in the state contain personal information such as name, address, social security number, birthdate, driver's license number, medical information, and other details. The reports also contain traffic accident data, driving offenses, traffic violations, license suspensions or revocations, and license status as well as additional information like traffic tickets, license plate number and other public information.

How to Request a State Driving History Report

An individual or company must start the request process by downloading the proper form and filling it out. If someone other than the subject of the record makes the request, they must also download and fill out the authorization form.

They allow requestors to get records through the mail or by visiting their offices in person at:

Town Square Building
445 Minnesota Street, Suite 190
St. Paul, MN 55101-5190

They can also get records by email or phone. If ordering through the mail, the requestor must send a legible copy of their state-issued ID or driver's license.

Minnesota Motor Vehicle Records Cost

When requesting records, the individual must pay a fee. They can request certified or non-certified records.

The cost for a non-certified driving record in Minnesota is $9 for an individual and $9.50 if not the subject of the record. The non-certified version will only go back five years.

A certified record costs an individual $10 and $10.50 if the requestor is not the subject of the record.

Driving Laws in the State

Car crashes are the second leading cause of death for teens in Minnesota (30+ each year). Therefore, the state has instituted a graduated license program.

Someone must be at least 15 years old to apply for a driving permit. Then they can drive supervised with other restrictions while taking driver education classes. Their parent or guardian must also attend a teen driver awareness program. After completing the class and passing a written and driving test, they can apply for their license.

Teen drivers are subject to the following restrictions:

For the first six months of licensure: Driving is prohibited from midnight – 5 a.m.

Exemptions:

  • Driving when accompanied by a licensed driver age 25 or older
  • Driving between home and place of employment
  • Driving to/from home and a school event for which the school has not provided transportation
  • Driving for employment purposes

The nighttime limitation is lifted after the first six months of licensure.

  • For the first six months of licensure: Only one passenger under the age of 20 is permitted unless accompanied by a parent or guardian
  • For the second six months of licensure: No more than three passengers under the age of 20 are permitted unless accompanied by a parent or guardian
  • It's illegal for drivers under age 18 to use a cell phone, whether hand-held or hands-free - except to call 911 in an emergency
  • It's illegal for drivers of all ages to compose, read, or send text messages or access the Internet while the vehicle is in motion or a part of traffic

Some other featured laws in the state from the DVS are:

Primary Seat Belt Law

Minnesota's seat belt law requires all motorists — drivers and passengers in any seat — to be buckled up and children in the correct child restraint. Law enforcement will stop and ticket unbelted drivers and passengers, including those in the back seat.

Booster Seats Required

 Children must ride in a booster seat after they have outgrown a forward-facing seat (typically age 4 and 40-60 pounds) until they are age eight or 4'9" tall — whichever comes first. It is recommended to keep a child in a booster based on their size rather than age. Boosters are seat lifts that help adult seat belts fit children properly.

Text + Drive = Ticket. >:- (

It is illegal for drivers of all ages to compose, read, or send electronic messages or access the Internet on a wireless device when the vehicle is in motion or part of traffic. This includes being stopped in traffic or at a light.

Stronger DWI Sanctions and Ignition Interlock

All repeat DWI offenders — and first-time offenders arrested at twice the legal limit — will now encounter stronger DWI sanctions. These offenders must use ignition interlock or face at least one year without a driver's license. 

Texting and Web Access

  • It is illegal for drivers of all ages to compose, read, or send electronic messages or access the Internet on a wireless device when the vehicle is in motion or part of traffic. This includes being stopped in traffic or at a light

The law does not apply to permanently affixed devices to the vehicle or global positioning or navigation systems.
Texting and web access statute — M.S. 169.475

Cell Phone Use and Texting

  • It is illegal for drivers under age 18 to use a cell phone, whether hand-held or hands-free — except to call 911 in an emergency

Permit and Provisional License statues—MS 171.05 and MS 171.055 Subd. 2(a)

  • Cell phone use is totally banned for school bus drivers

School bus driver statute —MS 169.443 Subd. 9(b)

Reckless or Careless Driving

  • Distracted drivers can be ticketed for reckless or careless driving when their actions demonstrate a disregard for the safety or rights of others

Speeding/Aggressive Driving

  • Motorists stopped at 20 mph over the speed limit face double the fine, and those ticketed traveling more than 100 mph can lose their license for six months
  • Every driver must drive at a speed that is reasonable and prudent under the conditions. 
  • Drivers must be aware of the actual and potential hazards on the highway and use due care in operating a vehicle

For a comprehensive guide to the nation's traffic laws, reference DrivingLaws.AAA.com.

The state does not use a points system but does keep track of each moving violation. If too many are incurred in a short period of time, it may result in the revocation or suspension of the person's driver's license.

Different Types of Driving Reports in the State

The state has only one type of driving history report. However, they do offer it in two flavors (certified or non-certified).

5-Year History (non-certified)

The non-certified driving history report will contain personal details about the driver, such as their name, address, social security number, date of birth, and driver's license number. It will also include accidents, civil and criminal driving offenses, revocations, suspensions, license, status, and CDL information. However, the report will only go back five years. These may be used for background checks and employment.

Certified History

The certified driving history report will contain personal details about the driver, such as their name, address, social security number, date of birth, and driver's license number. It will also include accidents, civil and criminal driving offenses, revocations, suspensions, license, status, and CDL information. The report will include everything going back to when the person first got their license. The certified copy costs $1 more.

Criminal Driving Offenses

Criminal driving offenses are serious crimes and may be punishable by steep fines, jail or prison time, the loss of a driver's license, and sometimes other court-ordered programs. Some examples of criminal driving offenses in the state are:

  • Reckless driving (90 days in jail and $1,000 fine)
  • Vehicular manslaughter (10 years in prison, $20,000 fine)
  • Driving without a license or one that is suspended or revoked
  • Careless driving
  • Causing death to another person through driving (10 years in prison, loss of license, $20,000 fine)
  • Great bodily harm to an unborn child (5 years in prison, $10,000 fine)
  • Substantial bodily harm to another (3 years in prison, $10,000 fine)
  • Bodily harm to another person (1 year in prison, $3,000 fine)
  • DWI/DUI/OWI

The punishments for commercial drivers may be worse. These types of actions could result in cancellation of your automobile insurance policy. Some insurance providers will not cover you with a criminal offense and others may increase your insurance rates.

Civil Driving Offenses

Civil driving offenses are far less serious and usually punishable only by a fine. Some examples of civil driving offenses in the state are:

  • Expired tabs
  • Speeding (less than 10 mph over the speed limit)
  • Brake light not working
  • Parking too close to a fire hydrant
  • Not wearing a seat belt
  • Failure to stop at a stop sign or red light
  • Expired driver's license

State Driving Records Statistics

Minnesota takes driving safety seriously and therefore keeps close track of all accidents and incidents so they can respond with better roadway safety programs. Some interesting driving facts for 2019 are:

There were 364 deaths on Minnesota road in 2019 compared with 381 in 2018. The 2018 Crash Facts Summary is now available.

The 364 fatalities include:

  • 248 motorists
  • 50 pedestrians
  • 10 bicyclists
  • 44 motorcyclists

Of the 364 fatalities:

  • 89 were known to be drunk-driving related
  • 75 were known to be speed related
  • 34 were known to be distracted driving related
  • 73 were unbelted motorists

Driving Records Search Frequently Asked Questions

Below are some frequently asked questions about state driving records.

Who Can Get a Copy of Your Minnesota Driving Record?

Only authorized individuals and companies can get a copy of your driving record. On the application form, the requestor must indicate why they need the information. Typically, these reports are used by employers, private detectives, insurance companies, government agencies, and businesses that deal with driving or safety.

Can I Order a State Driver's License Records Online?

No, the state does not have an online program except for government agencies. They have a closed system that is not open to the public. The public must get copies through the mail, in person, by phone, or by email.

What Information Do I Need to Get a Motor Vehicle Report (MVR)?

When ordering a copy for yourself, you will need your name, address, driver's license number, and date of birth. You must also pay the fee with a check or money order. You must also send in a copy of your Minnesota driver's license with your signature on the form notarized.

Anyone requesting a copy of your report must also fill out an authorization request and have you sign it.

Regardless of who orders the report, you must agree to the terms, which promise that you will comply with all DPPA laws. The Minnesota DMV requires compliance.

Does the State Use a Points System?

No. Minnesota is one of the few states that does not use a points system. However, they do keep track of moving violations, and if you incur too many in a short period of time, you may lose your license for a period of time or indefinitely.

At What Age Can You Get a Driving Permit?

When someone turns 15, they are eligible to apply for a driving permit to begin their journey towards their graduated driver's license. They must also have 30 hours of classroom study and supervised driving before applying. You must be 16 to apply for your real license.

What is a Graduated Driver License (GDL)?

The state takes a three-step approach to licensing, and each young person must follow each of the steps to achieve his or her full license. Each phase helps prepare the teen for different types of driving scenarios.

Helpful State Driving Record Links

Below are some helpful state driving record links.

Disclaimer: The materials presented here are for informational purposes only. The information is taken from state and local resources, and is current as of the most recent site update. Changes made by state and local departments and agencies after our latest update may render some information and fees outdated, and may cause links to break and forms to be unavailable. Infotracer strongly encourages you to visit the relevant state and local resources to ensure you have the most recent information.