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Connecticut Public Driving Records

The State of Connecticut Department of Motor Vehicles provides copies of Connecticut driving records upon request. Personal information contained within motor vehicle records is governed by section 14-10 of the state General Statutes and the federal Driver Privacy Protection Act (DPPA). Only the individual subject of the record, someone performing a background check like a licensed PI, an authorized party, or someone on the list allowed recipients may get copies.

The state offers a couple of different types of records, including a driver license file that includes endorsements, restrictions, and license class. They also provide a driving history report in either a CDL (for a commercial driver) format or a regular driver option which will show license revocations and traffic violations. Along with those, they can supply you with vehicle registration reports as well. For insurance companies, they offer a verification report showing that the licensed driver is insured which may help with auto insurance and insurance premiums.

Driving history reports will be the most comprehensive and contain the driver's name, address, date of birth, license number, plate number, and registration. It may also contain all their recent violations, sanctions, any license suspensions, and their driver's license status.

How to Request a Connecticut Driving Record

The Connecticut Department of Motor Vehicles handles all requests for driving history and other types of Connecticut driver records. They allow individuals and companies to obtain copies through the mail or in person. If you are ordering a copy for someone other than yourself, you can only do so through the mail. If you are requesting a copy in person, you must make an appointment. They do not offer any walk-in service.

The CT DMV provides a list of the only authorized agencies to issue these reports, and they include:

You can download the mail-in order form or bring it with you to the appointment. You must also pay the fee.

The motor vehicle agency's instructions for ordering through the mail state:

  • Check the box requesting Driving History
  • Fill in section 1 and sign the application
  • Indicate applicable code (see reverse of application)
  • Complete the "applicant" section at bottom of the form. You must also include your telephone number
  • Make check payable to "DMV" in the amount of $20
  • Copy of identification from the requestor. (Copy of driver license, non-driver identification card, or passport.)

Mail completed form and documents to:

Department of Motor Vehicles
Copy Records Unit
60 State Street
Wethersfield, CT 06161

CT Driving Record Cost

Obtaining a certified copy of your driving report is easy. However, you must follow the instructions above. If you order through the mail, you must also pay a $20 fee payable by check or money order.

If you make an appointment to get a copy in person, you will also have to pay the $20 fee. However, the Nutmeg State Financial Credit Union charges an additional $8 fee for the convenience. In-person, you may pay with cash, credit, or debit card.

Driving Laws in Connecticut

Anyone 16 years or older may apply for a learner's permit before getting their driver's license. Connecticut has strict rules about driving while on a learner's permit, which includes:

For the entire time, a driver holds a learner's permit, he or she may not have any passengers except for either:

  • A licensed driving instructor giving instruction and others accompanying that instructor
  • One person who is providing instruction and is at least 20 years old, has held a driver's license for four or more consecutive years and whose license has not been suspended during the four years prior to training. Parents or legal guardian may accompany the instructor

Additionally, learning permit holders may not drive after dark, everyone in the car must wear a seat belt, and no cell phone use is permitted. Drivers with a driver's license until they are 18 may not drive after dark.

Like many states, Connecticut has a points system, and these points accrue as drivers violate the laws. Some common points for violations include:

  • Speeding - 1 point
  • Failure to drive in the right-hand lane - 1 point
  • Improper operation on multiple-lane highways - 1 point
  • Improper operation on a divided highway - 1 point
  • Wrong direction at a rotary or one-way street - 1 point
  • Improper U-turn, failure to stop or signal when turning
  • Improper backing or starting -1 point
  • Not stopping for a school bus - 1 point
  • Illegal passing of a motorcycle - 1 point
  • Driving the wrong way on a one-way street - 1 point
  • Failure to give the proper signal - 1 point
  • Driving too slowly and impeding traffic - 2 points
  • Disobeying an officer's orders - 2 points
  • Entering or exiting a highway not using the designated area - 2 points
  • Turning from the wrong lane - 2 points
  • Failure to obey a railroad crossing signal - 2 points
  • Failure to stop at a railroad crossing by school bus, a commercial motor vehicle carrying flammable or explosive substance, taxicab, motor vehicle in livery service, motorbus, a motor vehicle used for the transportation of school children - 2 points
  • Not obeying a traffic light signal - 2 points
  • Not stopping at a stop sign - 2 points
  • Failure to yield at a yield sign - 2 points
  • Operating a vehicle through pedestrian safety zone - 2 points
  • Driving while impaired - 3 points
  • Failure to keep to right when meeting opposing traffic - 3 points
  • Improper passing or failure to yield to passing vehicle - 3 points
  • Passing on the right - 3 points
  • Passing in a no-passing zone - 3 points
  • Driving too close to another car (tailgating) - 3 points
  • Not granting another driver the right of way at an intersection - 3 points
  • Failure to grant the right of way at junction of highways - 3 points
  • Failure to yield when emerging from a driveway or private road - 3 points
  • Not granting the right of way to an ambulance, police, or fire truck - 3 points
  • Not granting the right of way to a pedestrian
  • Driving too close to another vehicle to harass them - 4 points
  • Passing a stopped school bus - 4 points
  • Driving a school bus too fast - 4 points
  • Vehicular manslaughter - 5 points

License points stay on the individual's record for 24 months. If they accrue too many points in a 12-month period, they could lose their license for a year or indefinitely.

Different Types of Driving Records in Connecticut

The state of Connecticut has a few different types of driver reports available. The most common are listed below:

Driver License Report

The driver license report is a report that will show the driver's license status, endorsements, any restrictions, and original issue date and status, not the license itself.

Driver History Report

The driving history report will show the driver's full list of any violations, citations, parking tickets, license status, and sanctions. The report will show both civil and criminal driving charges. This report is considered a certified driving record.

Registration File

The registration file report comes from the driver's registration. It will provide all the information on a regular car registration (car make, model, year, VIN, owner, and other details).

Insurance Information

The insurance information report will validate that the driver has current insurance. This report may be requested by law enforcement or insurance companies when setting insurance rates.

Criminal Driving Offenses

Criminal driving offenses in Connecticut are the more severe crimes that will result in harsher punishment than civil crimes. One of the most common and dangerous is reckless driving. A first offense is a Class D misdemeanor where the offender will face 30 days in jail plus a $100-$300 fine. The CT DVM will also suspend the driver's license for 30-90 days.

A second offense of reckless driving turns into a Class A misdemeanor, and a conviction could equal a year in prison, plus a $600 fine and a license suspension of at least 90 days.

Someone operating under the influence of drugs or alcohol (OUI or DUI) may plea bargain down to a charge of "wet reckless." That may result in less jail time and smaller fines.

Some other criminal offenses may include evading a police officer, vehicular manslaughter, driving without a valid license, and other serious infractions.

Civil Driving Offenses

Civil driving offenses are far less serious, and the sanctions are usually just a fine. Sometimes an officer may let the driver off with just a warning.

Some examples of civil driving offenses in Connecticut are:

  • Running a stop sign or red light
  • Speeding (below 24 mph over the speed limit)
  • Parking in a no-parking zone or expired parking meter
  • Driving without valid registration or inspection
  • Broken taillight

State Driving Records Statistics

For 2018, some glaring driving statistics for Connecticut include:

  • Population: 3,572,665
  • Millions of miles traveled in a vehicle: 31,596
  • Fatal crashes: 276
  • Deaths: 294
  • Deaths per 100,000 population: 8.2
  • Deaths per 100 million miles traveled in a vehicle: 0.93
  • Observed seat belt use: 92%

The most common reasons for Connecticut's car crashes, injuries, and fatalities are:

  • Distracted driving
  • Excessive speeding
  • Driving under the influence
  • Driving while tired
  • Driving an unsafe vehicle or in unsafe conditions

Driving Records Search Frequently Asked Questions

Below are some frequently asked questions about state driving records.

How Can I Get a Copy of My Driving Report?

The state of Connecticut makes it easy to get a copy of your Connecticut driving report. You can do so by appointment at the DMV or through the mail, just download a copy records request form (form j-23)and mail it in. You have to include a copy of your photo ID.

Can I Order a Record Online?

No, but you can schedule an appointment online with one of the four DMV offices that offer this service. Then you can show up in person and get a copy of your driving record.

What is Included in the Report?

It depends on the type of report you order. One has insurance information only (for insurance agencies), another is more about your license, and another includes driving history with infractions, crimes, etc.

Can I Order One by Mail?

Yes. Download the form on the DMV website, fill it out with a copy of your license, and mail it in with the fee.

Who Can Get a Copy of My Motor Vehicle Record?

According to state laws and federal DPPA laws, only specific people can get a copy of your motor vehicle records that contain personal information like your social security number, home address, and medical information. Employers, government agencies, and others with a signed consent form may also get a copy of your motor vehicle record.

Helpful State Driving Record Links

Below are some helpful state driving record links.

Disclaimer: The materials presented here are for informational purposes only. The information is taken from state and local resources, and is current as of the most recent site update. Changes made by state and local departments and agencies after our latest update may render some information and fees outdated, and may cause links to break and forms to be unavailable. Infotracer strongly encourages you to visit the relevant state and local resources to ensure you have the most recent information.