Washington Court Records Search

Criminal Court Records, Civil Court Records, Traffic Court Records, Federal, State, County & Municipal Sources and Much More!
The following is for informational purposes only

Washington Court System

Washington Court System

The Washington Court System consists of four levels: The Supreme Court, the Court of Appeals, the Superior Courts, and then the Municipal and District Courts.

The Supreme Court is located in Olympia. There is at least one District Court in each county, and most cities have a Municipal Court. The Supreme Court is the highest court in the state and the court of last resort for many cases. The Supreme Court works closely with the Court Clerk’s Office, the Commissioner’s Office, the Reporter of Decisions Office, and the State Law Library. Judges in the Supreme Court are elected and serve staggered six-year terms.

The Court of Appeals is the intermediate appellate court for the state and hears most of the appeals coming from lower courts and administrative agencies. The state of Washington has an “Appellate Case Processing Guide” to assist patrons of the court when they are involved in an appeal. Court of Appeals judges are elected and also serve six-year staggered terms.

The state of Washington also has special problem-solving courts for things like juvenile delinquency, drug and alcohol addiction, veterans’ problems, mental health issues, and families in crisis. These courts focus on rehabilitation and treatment rather than just punishment for repeat offenders.

Supreme Court
Court of Appeals
Superior Court
Municipal Court
District Court

Washington Court Records That are not Open to the Public

Unless protected by state laws, court order or federal mandate, all court records in Washington will be readily available to the general public with a few exceptions:

- “Adoption records.

- Mental illness commitment records.

- Alcohol and drug treatment commitment records.

- Paternity records (except final orders).

- Confidential name-change records.

- Juvenile non-offender records (Juvenile Dependency, Truancy, At-Risk Youth, Child in Need of Services, Termination of Parental Rights, and Developmental Disability Placement).

- Court records sealed by judicial order.”

Additionally, federal law protects things like children’s names, social security numbers, tax IDs, banking information, and trade secrets from being included in open public records.

Filing Information

Filing Information

The state of Washington makes it easy for patrons of the court system to file cases. The very first item on their judicial branch website is a section of forms. They separated the forms into categories for common cases like divorce, child support, protective orders, criminal offenses, juvenile cases, mental health issues, guardianships, adoption matters, and civil lawsuits. Filing must be done in person with the Court Clerk of the courthouse where the case will be heard. Legal assistance is available to self-represented litigants and other people needing help. They also offer ADA accommodations at their courthouses.

Search Washington Court Records Online

Did you know you could use Infotracer to search for court records in Washington? With access to thousands of Washington court cases, Infotracer makes it easy to find court records in King County, Pierce County, and Snohomish County. Thanks to the Washington Public Records Act Chapter 42.56 RCW, all public citizens have the right to review criminal court records, civil cases, family and probate matters, bankruptcies and more.

Anyone can perform a court records search in private without requesting permission or needing a good reason. All records will be available online except those that have been marked as confidential by law.

Try Infotracer today to get free instant access to Washington court records from most courts in the state. Performing a Washington state court records search by name is the best way to lookup cases online from Washington superior courts, municipal courts, and district courts.

Washington Court Statistics

In 2012, the Washington courts received 2,377,252 filings. In 2016, the number of filings decreased by 77.3% and counted 539,800 filings and had 577,687 outgoing cases

Total State Caseloads

Year Total Caseload
2012 2,377,252
2013 2,465,634
2014 593,689
2015 572,805
2016 539,800

Share of Court Type Incoming Caseloads

Court Type Incoming Caseloads
Civil 44%
Criminal 44%
Domestic Relations 11%

Family Court Cases

Domestic relations caseload of Washington at year end of 2016 has decreased by 7.7% compared to the last 5 years, in 2012 the number of incoming cases have been 64,944 but are higher than in 2015.

Year Domestic Relations Caseload Total Statewide Caseload
2012 64,944 2,377,252
2013 63,413 2,465,634
2014 61,506 593,689
2015 60,734 572,805
2016 59,949 539,800

Washington Criminal Caseloads

The number of criminal cases in Washington courts counts to 239,166, with 53,679 felony cases and 185,487 misdemeanors accordingly.

Year Criminal Caseload Misdemeanor Caseload Felony Caseload
2012 277,027 229,481 47,546
2013 266,445 215,956 50,489
2014 245,573 195,702 49,871
2015 244,578 193,471 51,107
2016 239,166 185,487 53,679

Superior Courts

Washington’s Superior Courts are the general jurisdiction courts for the state and the highest trial courts. They have original jurisdiction over criminal and civil matters. They also handle limited appeals from the lower courts. Some Superior Courts have a Juvenile Division to specifically handle all issues dealing with children. There are 30 judicial districts in the state and a Superior Court in each of the 39 counties in Washington. In rural parts of the state, some Superior Courts share one judge. Judges are elected to four-year terms and vacancies are handled by the Governor appointing a judge to fill in until the next election.

Municipal Courts

Washington’s Municipal Courts are limited jurisdiction courts and handle mostly city ordinance violations such as traffic cases and parking tickets. They can only handle issues that occur within the city limits. Their jurisdiction is limited to gross misdemeanors, infractions, domestic violence issues, no-contact orders, and other protective orders. Most cities in Washington have Municipal Courts, and more than 2 million total cases are filed in Municipal and District Courts. Approximately seven out of eight cases filed in Washington courts are processed at the Municipal and District Court level.

District Courts

Washington’s District Courts are limited jurisdiction courts also but can handle both criminal and civil cases. Many cases seen in District Courts are gross misdemeanors, traffic, and non-traffic violations such as DUIs, reckless driving, driving without a license or assault in the fourth degree. They also process preliminary hearings for felonies, civil cases of up to $100,000, contract disputes, personal injury cases, domestic abuse issues, protective orders, small claims of up to $5,000 and landlord/tenant matters. District Court judges serve four-year terms, and they must attend 45 hours of training every three years.

Washington Court Records Search