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Instant Court Records Search

Access Criminal, Civil and Traffic Court Records
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What Does a Court Records Report Include?

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There is a lot of information contained in court records. However, performing a case search can be difficult and time-consuming. You must know the person’s name and the court where the case took place. Some courts allow you to request information online, by phone, mail, or in person. Some courts have a better filing system and make the job easier, but most require assistance. When requesting copies of files, the county clerk may charge a fee. An InfoTracer search can drastically simplify the process and help you easily find records from all over the country within minutes. Using our powerful search engine, you can find multiple court case types (based on availability), felonies, misdemeanors, traffic court records, bankruptcy filings, liens, judgments, and more. Our 2 billion records are updated continuously, and all you need to search is the person’s name and state. The information you can find in our court record reports include when available:

  • Criminal Records
  • Arrests
  • Civil Cases
  • Bankruptcy Filings
  • Legal Judgments
  • Liens
  • Driving Violations
  • And More

What are Court Records?

US Court System Explained - How to Find Court Records

Court records contain vast amounts of information created, collected, managed, and stored by the courts. A court docket is the summary of the legal action that took place within the court. Court records contain a lot of information such as litigant details, case numbers, court dates, case information, jury records, case files, attorney records and contact information, dockets, pleadings, motions, briefs, court orders, memos, and expert testimony along with other evidence. Using court records, you could easily find out if someone is involved in a civil court case or charged with a criminal conviction.

Types of Courts in the U.S.

The United States has two types of courts, state and federal. Each court is designed for a specific purpose and handles different case types. Some common types of courts throughout the U.S. include:

Criminal Court

Criminal Court

Criminal courts handle criminal cases that deal with crimes against other people or against the state. For example, when someone breaks the law, the state (the plaintiff) will bring a case against them (the defendant). The district attorney for the state will make a case and argue that the person is guilty and must be punished. Sometimes these cases use a trial by jury, or the judge will decide. Criminal courts handle misdemeanors, felonies, and even violations and infractions. Some common crimes are murder, rape, assault, larceny, burglary, motor vehicle theft, DUI/DWI, and arson.

Civil Court

Civil Court

Civil courts are designed to settle disputes between two parties. A civil case does not always involve the state and may or may not use a jury. Civil courts handle tort cases, property liens, tax liens, lawsuits, and sometimes family cases, probate, bankruptcy, and small claims. The types of cases handled in civil court will vary based on state law.

Family Court

Family Court

Family courts strictly handle family cases such as marriage licenses, divorces, child support, child custody battles, adoption, alimony, and other partnership issues. Typically, family court cases are handled by a judge and not a jury.

Probate Court

Probate Court

Probate courts handle estates, guardianships, conservatorships, trusts, and wills. These courts also handle matters where an adult has a mental health condition and must be institutionalized. These cases are also handled by a judge rather than a jury.

Traffic Court

Traffic Court

Some states have courts specifically designed to handle traffic infractions, violations, and crimes. Some examples would be traffic tickets, DUI/DWIs, and other motor vehicle offenses. In addition, traffic courts may handle minor crimes or more serious misdemeanors and even felony crimes.

Juvenile Court

Juvenile Court

Juvenile courts handle offenses committed by people under the age of 18. Often these courts will use a rehabilitative approach rather than a punitive one to steer young people towards the right track, so they don’t lead an entire life of crime. These records may be sealed (depending on the state) until the person reaches the age of 18.

Bankruptcy Court

Bankruptcy Court

The bankruptcy court handles all types of bankruptcy matters. These courts fall under the federal system and hear cases when someone is in financial trouble and appeals to the court for bankruptcy. They may include cases for Chapter 7, Chapter 11, Chapter 12, Chapter 9, Chapter 13, and Chapter 15 bankruptcies. Both individuals and companies may file for bankruptcy. These courts help people reorganize their debt, pay their creditors, or absolve the debt.

State Court Systems in the U.S.

State Court Systems in the U.S.

State courts vary widely from region to region across the U.S. There is no standard for types of courts. Some states prefer to split their courts across towns, municipalities, counties, and other jurisdictions. The judicial administration of each state determines the court structure. Most states, however, have a Court of Appeals and a Supreme Court. The Supreme Court is the court of last resort and handles the final ruling. The Court of Appeals handles appeals when someone feels that the verdict of the original case was mishandled.

Some state courts include county courts, municipal courts, superior courts, circuit courts, district courts, appellate courts, tax courts, and small claims.

Federal Court Systems in the U.S.

The federal court system is one of the three branches of the federal government and is called the judicial branch. They are divided into trial courts for cases of the first instance, appellate courts to review contested decisions, and the court of last resort for the country: The Supreme Court of the United States of America (SCOTUS). Federal courts handle federal offenses, usually against the country or government, such as terrorism, kidnapping, and sex offenses.

Circuit Courts

Circuit Courts

There are 13 circuit courts across the country. Twelve of these courts cover 12 different circuits composed of multiple states and the Federal Circuit Court of Appeals, which has nationwide jurisdiction. Once a federal district court has made a decision on a case, the circuit courts are where the litigants can appeal the case. Each circuit court has between six and 29 judges who are appointed for life by the President or until voluntary retirement.

District Courts

District Courts

The district courts serve as the federal judicial branch’s general trial courts. They handle both criminal and civil cases relating to federal law. There are nearly 700 judges in the district court system nationwide, and the President appoints them for life after confirmation by congress. They must maintain a good track record, or they can face impeachment. In addition to criminal and civil trials, some special courts have also been set up to hear cases relating to bankruptcy, federal taxes, international trade, or claims against the federal government.

InfoTracer is not a consumer reporting agency under the Fair Credit Reporting Agency (FCRA) and does not provide FCRA compliant consumer reports. InfoTracer does not permit the use of information obtained from their service for use in discriminating against any consumer or for the purposes of determining a consumer's eligibility for personal credit, insurance, employment, housing, licenses, or benefits. It also does not permit the use of gathered information for any purpose related to a consumer's economic or financial standing or status.

Frequently Asked Questions About Court Records

Are Court Records Public?

Yes. Most all court records are public records. However, there are exceptions to this rule. For example, some juvenile court cases and records may be sealed until the person reaches the age of 18. Each state and court have its own court rules. Consult the specific court information to find out what records are public. Some offer online access, and some do not.

What are Sealed Court Records?

Some case records are sealed from public view. These things may include private marriages, juvenile records, domestic violence cases, sexual abuse issues, and expunged records. Typically, court records are sealed to protect the privacy of the individual(s) and the innocent.

How to Find Court Records on a Person

Although you can perform a records search and visit courthouses in person, it can quickly become time-consuming and costly if you need copies. A quicker and better way is to use an InfoTracer search to find court records from all over the country. Search using only the person’s name, and anything associated with them (based on the availability of records) will come up.

How to Remove a Court Judgments from Court Records

It can be tricky to have court judgments removed from court records. Depending on the type of case, the state, and specific court type, sometimes offenders can apply for expungement or sealing to hide or remove their court records from public view. Typically, offenders must pay court fees when filing for expungement.

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